610.530.8752

Category Archives: landscape planting

Architectural Landscaping Containers

Landscape Pots
Architectural Pots at MANTS show 2017

Architectural Landscaping Containers add character and interest to patio landscaping projects, front entry landscapes  or as accents in landscape planting beds. I was recently at the Maryland Nursery and Landscape Trade Show in Baltimore Md. (MANTS) where each year I am excited by the many new and old options of architectural pottery and landscape containers. The manufacturers keep improving the technology for attractive, quality finishes.  I want them all for my landscape, but let’s be smart about this. Each type and style of landscape containers has a unique fit in the gardens.

Urn
Iron Urn at Mants 2017

One of the most classical Architectural Landscaping Containers is the metal urns as in the picture above. These fit especially well in more formal gardens with architectural plantings and classically designed patios. Iron fluted landscape containers are popular at either side of a front door in the front of house landscaping.  The extra large metal urn pictured above would sit well within the landscape plantings. The large scale makes a focal point statement int the gardens.

Landscape Pots
Rustic Architectural Pottery

For a less formal, more organic landscape, clay pottery may be an ideal fit. The architectural pottery shown above has lovely antique finishes that would accent a casual paver patio and backyard landscape project. Combine a few sizes in close proximity to develop more dynamic container gardens. The balance of three is especially pleasing aesthetically (small, medium and large). Not the longer, more trough type containers on the right. Combine those in an arrangement to create even more landscape interests.

Versialles Box
Zinc Versailles Box

The Versailles Box style container offers an especially substantial architectural interest for landscape spaces. These are commonly planted with larger specimen shrub or tree options. A ‘standard’ form of hydrangea tree would be an appropriate scaled specimen for these Versailles boxes.

Landscape Plants – Sun vs. Shade

Landscape plants
Landscape Plants
Front of House Landscaping

Sun versus Shade – Landscape Guide for proper plant choices

What amount of sun is full sun, part sun or partial shade? And how can knowing these specifications guide plant choices?

Each landscape plant has a preferred range of sun exposure. All shrubs, trees and perennials need sunlight. And it is often more than one would think. But each plant has specific sunlight preferences relating to the quantity of light, the quality of light, and the time of day it receives that sunlight exposure. These specific light exposure preferences are easily found with sources such as http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org with their PlantFinder application. This source provides a detailed range of landscape specifications for virtually all ornamental landscape shrubs, trees and perennials.

The majority of landscape trees, shrubs and perennials prefer over six hours of full sunlight. This is considered a full sun preference. Within the full sun plant category, there are many nuances that are less easily understood. For example, many Hydrangea varieties are listed as a full sun plant. However, Hydrangea does not like hot, late day sun. Therefore, Hydrangea should be located where they get good morning sunlight into early afternoon. That would be on the east side of buildings or larger shrub and tree groupings.

Few landscape plants are truly adapted to blazing full sun throughout the entire day. Mediterranean plants like roses, Hypericum, lavender and succulents all tolerant full, hot, all day full sun. They are also a group of plants that tend to be drought tolerant. They in fact prefer the dry soil over too much water. Thought the standard is at least six hours of sunlight, this group may be best classified as a full, full sun grouping and prefers at least 8 to 10 hours of sunlight to be healthiest. This landscape category also tends to tolerate the sandy or clay soils with little organic components.

The full sun, part shade landscape plants is a category that includes plants that prefer at least 3 hours of full sunlight. They will tolerate more if available. But this category of tree, shrub and perennial often prefers relief from late day sun or full summer hot sun. These plants will tolerate mildly filtered sunlight if direct, unimpeded sunlight is not available. But don’t expect as optimal plant health if placed in filtered light.

Part shade plants are a group thrives best in filtered sunlight. For example, a loose tree canopy above the landscape gardens will allow dappled sunlight through to give a sequence of sun and shade to each plant. These plants are the types that tend to wilt and burn easily if exposed to direct sunlight any time after morning. They are also a group of plants that tend to prefer rich, organic soils because they have evolved in the hummus of a forest floor.

The full shade plant category is by far the most limited with regard to options and choices. Not many plant families or species truly prefer full shade. At least not many that are commonly used in the ornamental horticulture and landscape trades. We struggle to find plant options when a garden is especially shady. And often those garden tend to be dry in the urban and sub-urban landscape posing yet another level to the plant choice challenge. Plants like Rhododendron are often thought of as full shade plants, but that is a misconception. The plant will tolerate full shade, but it will not be as healthy and grow as well as it would in a part shade setting.

Landscape plants and plantings have preferences, but will often tolerate a little less or a little more sunlight than generally specified. They may not grow as well, but sometimes we just have to put a certain plant in a certain location because we love it there. This means we may need to water the plant and fertilize it more, take a little extra care. But don’t be afraid to try and to learn. That process is the joy of landscaping, the journey not the desitnation.

A completed landscaping project in Allentown, PA

This video is a landscape design and landscape construction project completed by Garden Design in Allentown, PA. The landscaping included a brick patio, stone steps and landscape plantings. This is an existing landscape that was renovated. The project also included a custom cedar wood fence.

This landscaping design was based on a client wanting a diverse range of plantings to create a lush landscape garden. There were some existing plants in the projects area that we re-used. The Japanese maple stayed in place by the side patio. We transplanted the perennials including hosta, ghost fern, and daylily to name a few.

The new plantings included deciduous azalea by the large back windows. We in stalled a range of colors of the exbury variety of azalea. Vanderwolf pines are installed along the back fence to create a privacy screen. These are a lovely pine with a thick, blue hued needle. Serbian spruce are placed along the side fence to screen views of the neighbors house. Flowering shrubs include hydrangea, viburnum, and beauty berry. Aucuba was used as an evergreen shrub in the dense shade.

The outdoor patio space is set at the side sun room. The patio is natural clay brick with a bluestone border. The custom cedar fence provides privacy for the patio. An irregular flagstone patio leads from the patio to the back landscape gardens. Bluestone heavy tread steps transition the walkway from the patio to the back yard gardens. These large, natural cut stones add a warm organic character to the project.

natural brick patio landscaping
a brick patio in Allentown pa

Garden Design Inc. is a landscaping company located in Allentown PA. We specialize in outdoor living projects that include patios, landscaping, landscape lighting and much more. The quality of landscape design stems from the experience and skills of our landscape designers. We gratefully compete with a few other good landscaping companies in our Allentown market. They keep us designing the best landscapes we can creatively dream up.

Landscape Plan for Swimming Pool

Landscaping Swimming Pool
Landscape Plan for Swimming Pool

Garden Design Inc. developed this landscape plan for a swimming pool project in the Allentown area.  We were one of several landscape companies invited to develop a plan and a proposal for a swimming pool that had been built last season. When we are competing with other companies for a project, our first step is to develop a conceptual landscape plan. This plan does not take the full amount of time required to specify the exact trees, shrubs and perennials in a landscaping plan. It does allow us to present our general ideas and develop a budget to build the landscape project. If the client chooses to work with Garden Design Inc., then we will invest the time to specify the exact plants in the landscape planting plan.

The forms of each plant symbol do represent a general type of plant in the landscape design idea, even thought eh specific plant is not yet determined. The larger green shrub symbols represent both deciduous and evergreen shrubs. A combination of these two shrub types create the most pleasing aesthetic affect. The design principle is to create contrasting and complimentary colors and textures with both the leaves and the flowers. The evergreens will be placed in areas where we intend to screen a view year round. Species may include laurel, holly, viburnum, euonymus and taxus. Deciduous shrubs are generally more prolific with flowers and seasonal interest. They are often less expensive and they tend to grow faster. Hydrangea paniculata are one of our favorites with long bloom cycles, durability and dependability. These include the Hydragnea limelight, pinky winky, fire light and other new hybrids. The flowering viburnum such as Korean Spice are a strong depending border shrub.

The plan includes both evergreen and deciduous trees. The evergreens trees are placed to screen views of the closest house next door. Thuja ‘Green Giant’ and ‘Emerald Green’, Norway Spruce, Serbian Spruce, and Fastigiate Spruce are all good options for this landscape location. Three deciduous flowering trees are placed center of the plan to create a veil and sense of space within the pool garden landscape.

Simple dependable smaller shrubs such as spirea and hypericum will provide a landscape layering element with a series of flowering cycles. Ornamental grasses will offer an alternating texture and a screening for narrow spaces. Perennials such as daylily, coreopsis, and salvia provide the front of planting layer with additional color and texture interests.

The landscape plantings are designed with ample space to ensure this does not become a crowded planting. The intent is to always maintain some space between every plant grouping so that the landscaping doe not mush together. This will keep a clean, organized landscape aesthetic.

 

Landscape Planting Design, Emmaus, PA

Landscape Planting Design
Landscape Planting Plan, conceptual planting design for landscape project in Emmaus PA

Garden Design Inc. was invited to develop planting plans for the pictured property in Emmaus PA. The home is newly constructed with no existing landscaping. But, it does have outstanding views of the natural landscape vistas beyond the back of the home. The program for this phase of landscaping is divided into four phases. One phase is to provide a beautiful entry planting where the driveway exits the main road. Another priority is to install tree, shrub and perennial plantings along the busy main road. The front of the home plantings invite visitors and soften the architecture. Finally, several planting islands extend visual interest and create a sense of space to the gardens. This is a conceptual planting plan. It allows us to share the design ideas and character without investing the extensive time required to detail each planting choice. This level plan allows us to budget a project. Once a client reviews the ideas and budget, we can then design the specific plant varieties.

All of the gardens are a combination of trees, shrubs and perennials. Trees provide the main vertical architecture. They help scale a property into the surroundings. Trees also provide the middle and taller level layers to the landscape. This design has a combination of evergreen and deciduous trees. The evergreen trees are designed as landscape anchors and strong visual screens. The deciduous trees are mostly small to medium size flowering trees. These create a veil to screen views and provide seasonal interest in flowers and fall leaf color.

Shrubs are the backbones of a planting design. This design uses a combination of evergreen and deciduous flowering shrubs. Larger sizes are used along the roadway and the perimeters. These will tend to be more of the evergreen varieties that flower but not as profusely as others. Small and more ornamental shrubs are used to ward the fronts of the planting beds and nearer to the home.

Perennials, ornamental grasses and ground covers complete the planting design. These are arranged toward the front of the planting beds. The perennials are designed with contrasting textures and bloom seasons. The goal is continuous landscape interests from spring to fall.

The next phase in this project is to review with the client. With their direction, we will complete the planting specifications and a proposal to install the landscape project. For more images of landscape plans see Garden Design Plans on Pinterest or Garden Design Landscape Plans

 

 

Holiday Landscape Decorating

Late fall brings the end to the showy colors and rich foliage in most landscapes. But it is also a festive time of year with a couple major holidays running from late November until the New Year. Now is the time to empty the landscape containers and create winter landscape decorating. Mums and annual cabbages will carry the color through the Halloween season, but what to do for Thanksgiving and the December holidays? That is the time to empty your pots and urns of the summer plantings and replace them with fall-winter arrangements.

Start by taking out the old plants from your urns but leave the soil. Pick a couple or few central evergreen feature plant or deciduous twigs for the center and height of the pot. Cuttings from evergreen trees such as holly, spruce, pine, juniper or arborvitae work well. You can also use the bare branches of a red twig dogwood or the winterberry holly with its red berries. Trim the branch ends and insert them directly into the soil.

Next pick mid-level cuttings for the urn. Boxwood, cherry laurel and holly cutting with the red berries work well for the mid-level fillers and are easy to find. Blue color juniper can add a dynamic to the overall color scheme. Magnolia leaves and branches will add a varied texture. Think of these plants as the skirt that hides the bases and gives foundation to the central feature plants. Don’t be afraid to subtly add some fake fruit or ornament to this level.

Finally, the base level foliage can be added. You will want to look for something that hangs over the edges a bit and acts as the lower hem of the skirt. Low growing or weeping type junipers work well for this. If you have access to Russian Juniper (Microbiota) it makes a wonderful accent because the needles turn a beautiful bronze color. Ivy and Euonymus are long trailing plants that will hang low over the edges.

Winter Urns can be a fun and easy project for anyone. The required materials should be easy to find throughout the neighborhood. Finding and procuring them affords a good excuse to meet new neighbors during a holiday season.

Water Features: A Flowing Landscape Element

Water features can be created using a variety of materials.
Water features can be created using a variety of materials, and their water flow can be changed as well to produce a different effect in the landscape.

One of the lesser used forms of residential landscape design would be the implementation of water features. Typically, when a homeowner is proposed a water feature, there is often a wary and cautious response. As a homeowner, you may begin to worry about the cost of the feature, the upkeep and yearly maintenance, and the cost. In early forms of design, yes, this would have posed a problem in residential design. Fortunately, many designers and non-designers alike are finding new and innovative ways to create successful and low maintenance fountain and water features. Tutorials are even available online that teach those who interested to make their very own homemade water feature.

Implementing water features in your landscape, especially if well kept, can cause housing values to increase. Additionally, water features provide a classy appeal to a landscape which can make you feel as if you home is the most expensive on the block.

The types of water features can differ based on your own personal preference. Some of the more common water features include ponds and waterfalls; however, some of the newer ones consist of bubbling rocks and even cascade falls.

Certain flowing water features now have the ability to reuse its water using electrical pumps and the water flow rate can be set off on a timer to turn on or off at certain times. This is both cost and energy effective.

Consider evaluating your landscape and see if and where it would be most suitable to install a water feature. Keep in mind that water features should be placed in area where falling debri is minimal. Installing one near a pine tree is poor planning considering it is likely that pine needles will fall into the feature, which can potentially cause some problems and pump can clog or break. It is also important to ensure that proper lining is installed for in ground water features. Water that sits on karst landscapes, or limestone dominant land, can cause deterioration of the limestone and form sinkholes.

Aside from a few minor considerations, water features are versatile and have the ability to be used in a variety of environments. Depending the number and scale of water features, a focal point can be formed. A water feature can be surrounded by small perennials and shrubs or it can sit in the center of a paved or gravel space. This is solely up to the owner and the designer.  By the end of the implementation, a well-placed and design water feature will be on display for visitors, and it will create a calming atmosphere for the surrounding landscape.

Landscape Design Company

With a help of contrasting hardscape and lush vegetated greens, a brick home's facade can easily be softened.
With a help of contrasting hardscape and lush vegetated greens, a brick home’s facade can easily be softened.

Garden Design Inc. is a landscape design company that serves Coopersburg. Exploring deeper into the Lehigh Valley, there is evidence that the region has many historical architectural and landscape components. Touching on two smaller cities in the Lehigh Valley, Coopersburg and Hellertown, they are very similar is geographical make up; however, human population and existing development has left each city with its unique set of landscape design and construction opportunities.

With both cities covering less than three miles in area, Hellertown holds the higher population by almost double of Coopersburg. With that said, it is not surprising that Hellertown projects a tighter housing layout as a way to accommodate residents and business owners. While some may believe that the general lack of landscape eliminates the profession of landscape architecture, this statement is proven wrong. It is true that some elements of design may become restricted in urban design, other opportunities such as vegetation selection and hardscape design allow the design to explore.

Planting design is key in this type of urban residential landscape design, and utilizing shrubs that can withstand an urban environment is always a great way to start. Hydrangeas and rhododendron  as well as a wide range of perennials provide just enough pop of color in these cities that it catches the eyes of passersby, but it also does not provide so much that it looks out of place. Add some mulching to create a uniform groundcover that stands out from the grass and the hardscape.

Coopersburg and Hellertown developed fairly early, so there is little room for new construction and landscape design. With this said, residences were typically built much smaller back then. Since then, material choices for building construction has changed.  Some of the early developed houses are constructed of brick, which is often not seen in modern day housing construction materials. The red coloring produces a strong and almost harsh appearance to the house, but this can easily be softened through the use of vegetation. Shrubby evergreen plants and species of climbing plants have the ability reduce the visibility of the red brick, making the façade of the house less intense. Ideally, and this applies to any form of residential design, the design should be relatively low maintenance on the home owner. However, yearly pruning and cleaning will still need to take place.

Hardscape such as flagstone, bluestone, natural stone, and concrete are just a few examples of light colored materials that can be used as a strong contrast against brick for a walkway and/or patio design. Play around with mixing different paver types or arrangements to see which hardscape will work best for you and your landscape.

In a successful residential design, there is interest and visually pleasing vegetation arrangements ad hardscape implementation, but there is also an element that brings the viewer back to the original character of the building and the location. Take the opportunity to explore the unlimited options of landscape design in your area.

Landscape Curb Appeal

Dynamic front facades can allow simpler landscape designs; however, note the vibrancy of a color scheme that makes the vegetation stand out from the neutral stone.
Dynamic front facades can allow simpler landscape designs; however, note the vibrancy of a color scheme that makes the vegetation stand out from the neutral stone.

Curb Appeal is everything! The essence of suburban homes skyrocketed in popularity since their establishment in the 1950’s. What was once known as a weekend home has now turned into a permanent residence for many Americans. One element that has not changed since the development of these neighborhoods is the importance of curb appeal. Passersby are often given a strong first impression of the home owners just from a quick glance from a street view. With this in mind, every home owner should be mindful of their home’s appearance, and with a few small adjustments, a homeowner can make their curb appeal stand out from the rest.

Every home and its landscape are different; however, there are a few key elements that remain constant: front door, windows, garage and/or garage door(s), and plantings. Focusing on these aspects and finding ways to accentuate their best features is a great way to start improving a landscape.

Typically, the front door is the main focus in a frontal façade design. Knowing this, it is crucial to continue and promote focus on the door. Playing around with walkway design is a great way to dress up the front façade. Experiment with walkway design patterns using a linear and curvilinear directional, and try to stick with a walkway that is around 4 feet wide. This will give visitors more room to walk and it permits two people two people to stand shoulder to shoulder on the path.

Windows play a significant role in design choices as well. Rather than hiding a façade of a house with tall, dense vegetation, opt for vegetation that will feature the window. Short standing shrubs are typically a safe choice. Experiment with plant height and color to permit variety and interest to a formerly simple design.

The vegetation provides many options for the owners; however, stick to perennials, shrubs, and small trees that fit within the season and look for colors that mesh well together. Try incorporating species of hydrangea and rhododendron into a landscape. They are well-sized shrubs that have the ability to produce vibrant flowers. Flowering cherry trees are also beautiful when in bloom. When planting perennials, consider species such as Astilbes and daylilies.

Improving curb appeal can improve the overall neighborhood’s appearance and it creates more appeal for a potential homebuyer. Adding planted containers along the sides of the front door and window boxes on the windows and cleaning off walkways and garage doors can dress up a plain looking home. One lesser known element that can make or break your curb appeal is the appearance of the mailbox. Dress up the space with perennials and other small standing vegetation. Taking the opportunity to dress up your curb appeal will not only impress the neighbors, but it will also give you a yard that will make you proud to call your own.

Fall landscape planting

landscaping
landscape planting

Fall landscape planting projects are ideal. The reasons are both ecological and economic. Cooler fall temperatures leave plants less stressed as they adapt to their new environment. But more importantly, fall soil temperatures are ideal for root growth. Plants can get six to eight weeks of root growth before winter. This gives them a big advantage when next summer’s heat arrives. The exception is that some trees, such as many Oak varieties, are ‘fall dig hazards’ and are best not planted in autumn. (Ask your nurseryman for more information). Don’t forget to water your new plantings, as fall can sometimes be very dry.

Deals can often be had on plants in autumn for fall  landscape plating. Nurseries may drop prices if they are anxious to get rid of planting stock to avoid winterizing it or if they need to make room for holiday decor. Nursery plants will be larger at the end of the season, so you may get more plant for less money. Perennials can often be bought for half price or less since they are starting to die back. But put them in the ground anyway, and next spring they will shoot out strong. Landscape contractors may even lower installation prices if they want to get a little extra revenue before the seasonal shut downs.

Fall is perfect for pruning. It is much easier to see the branches and structures once the leaves have fallen from shrubs and trees. You will be able to determine which branches have die back and where certain diseases may need to be cut out. Thinning out trees and shrubs properly can also reduce potential winter damage from heavy wet snows or freezing rain. Pruning back perennials is a personal choice. Some professionals are adamant that perennials should be cut back in the spring so that the die back provides a winter blanket of protection. But if that is a messy look that drives you wild, go ahead and cut your perennials back in the fall.

Cooler weather does not mean the end to gardening. Autumn is a great time for fall landscape planting and pruning.